Thank you to everyone who came and watched 50 films and met 34 filmmakers and presenters. With over 300 people on opening night and over 500 people attending over the 3 days, this festival addressed ”Stories That Matter” and raised the voice of Indigenous people. 

It was a festival not to be forgotten. We celebrated more than just films, we built friendships and connections brought together by such purposeful topics. 

We kicked off the festival at the beautiful Njana Tilem Museum  with a stunning artistic performance by an aboriginal Dance group. Plus we had a Dayak dance performance accompanied by some truly beautiful and powerful films from and about indigenous communities worldwide. Films with reminders that our care for the environment is universal, and important indigenous perspectives on why the solutions to climate change need to be driven by indigenous communities. 

The following two days at Paradiso Ubud  was filled with films screenings that included award-winning productions as well as young Indigenous filmmakers presenting their films for the first time. What an incredible experience! Thank you for attending and all of your support!

Please continue to follow along and support us with various events held around Indonesia and world-wide by following us on Instagram.  http://bit.ly/2JnBXtR @indigenous.international

Can't wait to see you all next year!

Festival Committee 

BIIFF 2019

 

Review


”I loved the whole festival. The Indigenous Film Festival showcased wonderful and varied cultures and spirituality from around Indonesia and far beyond.
It also highlighted so many similar worldwide issues where these indigenous guardians of nature, as well as the keepers of ancient wisdom, have had their ancestral lands, way of life, down to their very beliefs, abused or even taken by corporate giants, or the church.
Important messages and stories that matter! Well done to all involved.”
— Julie S UK
“What an incredible last few days to have been under your golden wings - David and Shinta.
Seeing all the wonderful films and the network of people that you have brought together and nurtured is wonderful and provides a sense of validation for the filmmakers. It was an incredibly moving emotion to witness the passion that came from the Indonesian youth which has inspired me into action. I was particularly taken by the Mentawi cause of the young man, Martisan. I spoke to him after, and knowing he was going into the jungle, I arranged for a Sony Action Cam, to be delivered to him, so he has something to record on, for his return trip into the jungle.
— Michaela M

 

Indigenous Film Festival in Bali 2019

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Kynan, a 14 year old filmmaker from Kalimantan (Borneo) was one of the stars of the festival, backed by a powerful grass root movement of a new generation of media activists, using all possible media to communicate with local and global audience – from Papua New Guinea filmmakers taking a risk touching political issues to Ibu Onet, communicating with a Orang Utan puppet as Instagram star to local audience or international productions like Small Island – Big Song showing Austronesian culture interwoven from Madagascar to Easter island.

Emmanuela Shinta, founder of Indigenous Film Festival

Emmanuela Shinta, founder of Indigenous Film Festival

Emmanuela Shinta, a young activist from Kalimantan, who just spoke in front of the UN, founded the festival together with David Metcalf.

Co-founder David Metcalf (New Zealand) and Ado-Kaliting-Pacidal (Taiwan) presenting “Musical Healers of Land”

Co-founder David Metcalf (New Zealand) and Ado-Kaliting-Pacidal (Taiwan) presenting “Musical Healers of Land”

Getting organized: the power behind the new grass root movement are organizations like Wapikoni Mobile in Kanada, which provides media technology and knowledge to indigenious communities in Canada and supports aspiring filmmakers, like Craig Commanda and Jani Bellfleur-Kaltush, who presented their films and the Wapikoni project.

Craig Commanda and Jani Bellefleur-Kaltush in Q&A about their films and Wapikoni

Craig Commanda and Jani Bellefleur-Kaltush in Q&A about their films and Wapikoni

Rizal Lanni comes from mountain area of Papua New Guinea only accessible by airplane – he is one of Papuan Voices, an initiative of videographers in Papua  – check out Rizals youtube channel here . Yonri Revolt is a filmmaker and activist in Papua, also promoting archiving and presentation programs (more here).

Rizal Lanni and Yonri Revolt

Rizal Lanni and Yonri Revolt

Filmmakers as networkers: Hugo Metz is collaborating with many organizations and channels to give indigenious cultures a voice world wide- check out the huge youtube channel of “If not us then who?” here.

Multi-talent Charlie Hill Smith from Australia works as producer, networker & director in West Papua (trailer of his festival film here)

Hugo Metz and Charlie Hill Smith

Hugo Metz and Charlie Hill Smith

Music

Uyau Moris from Kalimantan

Uyau Moris from Kalimantan

Music is a powerful messenger, as two other festival films showed, both based on the Austronesian migration over 5000 years, rediscovering common roots, deeply touching in the film Musical Healers of Land by Ado Kaliting Pacidal and vibrant charismatic in Small Island Big Songorchestrating musicians from Madagascar to Easter Island in a project by Bao Bao Chen and Tim Coles.

director Ado Kaliting Pacidal, director of “Musical Healers of Land”

director Ado Kaliting Pacidal, director of “Musical Healers of Land”

Sometimes nothing is more powerful then the spoken word – as special guest Miliwanga Wurrben, grown up in the outback of Australia, showed in her welcome speeches. It all comes back to basics – an open heart – thanks for a great festival.

Miliwanga Wurrben

Miliwanga Wurrben

more on the film program here

The next Indigenous Film Festival will be in Kalimantan August 9th to 11th 2019, more here.

 
 

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